Population information

Nom ordre Charadriiformes
Nom famille Laridae
Nom scientifique Thalasseus sandvicensis Nom courant Sandwich Tern
Nom population sandvicensis, West & Central Asia/South-west & South Asia
Aire de reproduction Caspian Sea Aire de non-reproduction Coasts Persian Gulf & S Red Sea to Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka
Catégorie de la Liste Rouge Least Concern
Regions Ramsar Africa Asia
Notes

Réseau de conservation

Réseau de conservation Notes
AEWA
CAF Action Plan
Note:

Taille de population

Publication Start year End year Minimum Maximum Estimate quality Notes References Actions
WPE 1 0 0 110,000 110,000 No quality assessment [R414]
WPE 2 0 0 110,000 110,000 No quality assessment [R414]
WPE 3 0 0 110,000 110,000 No quality assessment [R414]
WPE 4 0 0 110,000 110,000 No quality assessment [R414]
WPE 5 1990 1991 110,000 110,000 Expert opinion [R414]
AEWA CSR 4 1990 1991 110,000 110,000 Expert opinion [R414]
AEWA CSR 5 1990 1991 110,000 110,000 Expert opinion [R414]
AEWA CSR 6 1985 1991 110,000 110,000 Best guess [S8437]
AEWA CSR 7 1985 1991 110,000 110,000 Best guess [S8985]

Population trends

Publication Start year End year Trend Trend quality Notes References Actions
WPE 1 0 0 Unknown No quality assessment
WPE 2 0 0 Unknown No quality assessment
WPE 3 0 0 Unknown No quality assessment
WPE 4 0 0 Unknown No quality assessment
WPE 5 0 0 Unknown No quality assessment
AEWA CSR 4 0 0 Unknown No quality assessment
AEWA CSR 5 0 0 Unknown No quality assessment
AEWA CSR 6 0 0 Unknown No idea
AEWA CSR 7 0 0 Unknown No idea

Population 1% level

Publication Yearset 1 percent Note
WPE 1 1994 1100
WPE 2 1997 1100
WPE 3 2002 1100
WPE 4 2006 1100
WPE 5 2012 1100
AEWA CSR 4 -1 -1 Not Set
AEWA CSR 5 -1 -1 Not Set
AEWA CSR 6 -1 -1 Not Set
AEWA CSR 7 2018 1100

References

  • R414 - Lloyd, C., Tasker, M.L. and Partridge, K. 1991. The status of seabirds in Britain and Ireland. T. and A.D. Poyser, London, U.K. 355 pp.
  • R1625 - BirdLife International (in prep) European Red List of Birds. Deliverable to the European Commission (DG Environment) in 2021 under Service Contract ENV.D.3/SER/2018/0018.
  • R1628 - Kalyakin, M., Morkovin, A. Voltzit, O., Sklyarenko, S., Urazaliyev, R., Kashkarov, R., Ten, A, Rustamov, E (2020): Breeding population estimates for selected waterbirds in West Siberia and Central Asia. Unpublished reports. Wetlands International & BirdLife International, Wageningen & Cambridge (UK).
  • R1619 - Nagy, S. & Langendoen, T. (2020) Flyway trend analyses based on data from the African-Eurasian Waterbird Census from the period of 1967-2018. Online publication. Wetlands International, Wageningen, The Netherlands. URL: http://iwc.test.wetlands.org/index.php/aewatrends8

Notes

  • S8437 - Little information on population size is actually available. Del Hoyo (1996) mentions an estimate of c. 40,000 breeding pairs at the Caspian Sea alone. Jennings (2010) mentions a count of 45,000 at Bar al-Hikman in 1991. There is insufficient information available to improve on the estimate although the current estimate for European RU is only 15,000-20,000 (European Topic Centre on Biological Diversity, in prep., BirdLife International et al., in prep.) and IWC count totals only go up to 13 thousands since then.
  • S8985 - See CSR6.
  • S9517 - The size of the breeding population is estimated at 9,080-18,030 pairs, or 27,000-54,000 individuals after rounding in AZ (BirdLife International, in prep.), TM and KZ (Kalyakin et al., 2020) based on data from the period of 1996-2019. The highest annual IWC count total between 2014–2018 was 9,780 individuals in 2014. Historically, the highest count total was 51,773 individuals mainly from OM in 1991 (Nagy & Langendoen, 2020).
  • T7663 - The breeding population is thought to be fluctuating in AZ (BirdLife International, in prep.), stable in TM and unknown in KZ (Kalyakin et al., 2020) between 2009 and 2018. Between 1980 and 2019, the population is thought to have declined in TM (Kalyakin et al., 2020). Trend assessments are the same for the long-term as for the short-term in other countries. Based on IWC data from IR, OM, PK and AE, Nagy & Langendoen (2020) reported uncertain trends for 1989-2017 (0.9069), 1993-2017 (3 generations; 0.9274) and for 2008-2017 (1.1123). Based on the smoothed imputed totals, the population has decreased by 66% (n.s.) in 24 years, i.e. in 3 generations. The decline has occurred not only in OM but also in AE and PK. However, the population is increasing in IR which may indicate shift of the wintering range.



Copyright Wetlands International 2012

Citation: Wetlands International (). "Waterbird Population Estimates" . Retrieved from wpe.wetlands.org on